Blade Runner Blow-out (Part 1 of 3)

A stylish revival of Film Noir detective films…

A brilliant (somewhat ironic) study of how mankind has lost it’s humanity… and how androids are more human than the rest of us…

A question of self awareness?

Blade Runner is probably the best example of how to skillfully craft a movie. It is a film that has aged well, and endured over the past 30+ years… It is a beautiful film, whose “retro-future” look has inspired films like Minority Report and Total Recall…

Blade Runner is also controversial: raising the idea that the main character might not be what he thought he was, and may have a connection to what he fears most…

Is Rick Deckard a Replicant?

The answer is not as clear cut as — hero dreams of unicorns… hero finds origami unicorn… The Police know his memories, so he must be a Replicant

It’s a little more complicated… Even in the alternate cuts of the film. To properly answer this question, we need to look at several themes:

First, there is a common theme in Ridley Scott’s films that during a quest to find God, all “servants” want to kill their masters… In Prometheus, the android David had the great line “Don’t all children want their parents dead?”

By that logic, the Replicant leader Roy kills Tyrell (his “father”/creator)… Deckard kills the Replicants, NOT his possible creators.

The theory that Deckard was created by Tyrell to hunt Replicants on Earth makes no sense because if all servants want to kill their masters, Deckard would want to kill Bryant, Gaff, and Tyrell too… Deckard even has a good reason to kill Gaff at the end of the film — to protect Rachel… but doesn’t.

Some fans get around this by saying that it is possible that Deckard is part of a new NEXUS series that was created by Replicants… That doesn’t work either… Replicants are outlawed on Earth, so if Deckard were a machine created by a machine and his memories programmed, he couldn’t have a clearly developed history with Bryant and Holden…

This theme would seem to confirm Deckard’s humanity…

Problem is, it doesn’t…

Depending on which version of the film you see, it may or may not have had voice overs by Harrison Ford which give you insight into the character’s emotional reactions to the events of the film… Both Ford and Ridley Scott were opposed to the inclusion of the voice overs… My opinion is that they have a place in the Theatrical Cut, but I don’t miss them in the Director’s Cut and Final Cut…

These voice overs tend to humanize the character, and show that unlike the “emotionally immature” machines, Deckard has a firm emotional grounding. Without the voice overs, he comes across as just a cold, emotionless killing machine.

This is interesting, because the “emotional immaturity” of the Replicants — due to their four year life span — actually makes them very passionate… Dare I say: more passionate than the human characters in the film… “More human than Human’, describes Tyrell… Roy is very passionate about his fellow Replicants, his life experiences, love, regrets, mortality… Deckard on the other hand, dismisses these things as “occupational hazards”… This suggests that machines have more “Humanity” than the Human Race…

These themes argue that Deckard is not a Replicant… But that does not end the debate…

There are several other controversial themes prevalent in Ridley Scott’s work that would indicate that he could be a machine… These themes include memories and dreams, and the “sexual urges of robots…” which was a theme that Ridley carried over from Alien. We’ll discuss those tomorrow.

And Friday, we’ll discuss production design, and the look of the film…

Advertisements
This entry was posted in Movies and tagged , , . Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s